How well can you really read a crowd? Take my quiz to find out!
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Q1. Which body part is thought to be the biggest communicator?


 
Correct! They often point to the person in the group who most has our focus, and a shaky foot can indicate anxiety.

 
Incorrect. It’s the feet. They often point to the person in the group who most has our focus, and a shaky foot can indicate anxiety.

 
Q2. During a presentation you notice many attendees’ legs are crossed. One thing you can know for sure is…


 
Affirmative. People cross their legs for all sorts of reasons—because they’re chilly, nervous or more comfortable that way. But researchers Allan and Barbara Pease found that having unfolded arms and legs increases the likelihood we’ll remember something by 38 percent.

 
Not necessarily. People cross their legs for all sorts of reasons—because they’re chilly, nervous, or more comfortable that way. But researchers Allan and Barbara Pease found that having unfolded arms and legs increases the likelihood we’ll remember something by 38 percent.

 
Q3. Your posture directly corresponds with your…


 
Bingo! Slouchy shoulders can mean you feel defeated or stressed, says body language expert Susan Constantine. But good posture can actually make you more confident around people, so straighten up!

 
Not quite. Empathy and believability don’t play into it. Slouchy shoulders can mean you feel defeated or stressed, says body language expert Susan Constantine. But good posture can actually make you more confident around people, so straighten up!

 
Q4. Someone telling a lie is often marked by…


 
Yup! No lie—most experts agree that an itch on the ol’ schnoz often indicates a falsehood. Maybe Pinocchio was onto something.

 
You’re right! (OK, I lied—this is incorrect.) Most experts agree that it’s an itch on the ol’ schnoz that often indicates a falsehood. Maybe Pinocchio was onto something.

 
Q5. A hand or two on the hips before or during a speech can help you to feel powerful, but careful! To others it can sometimes be seen as…


 
Not exactly. While the Superman pose could come off as any of these things (or all three!), the most common way it’s seen is threatening.

 
Yes. While the Superman pose could come off as any of these things (or all three!), the most common way it’s seen is threatening.

 
Q6. The right amount of eye contact to show someone you’re listening is…


 
Wrong. Forty percent is too little, and 90 percent—nearly a total stare-down—might seem creepy and intimidating. Shoot for 60 percent. (Tip: We event planners should aim to not look bored or psychotic, though admittedly at times this can be very difficult.)

 
Yes! It’s known as “The 60 Percent Rule” and is enough to show interest, pleasantly short of a creepy stare-down.

 
Q7. Using your hands while you speak…


 
Yep. Moving your hands activates the same area in your brain as speech production, so it can actually help you be more articulate. But careful, too much gesticulating can come across as frantic and anxious.

 
Negative. Moving your hands activates the same area in your brain as speech production, so it can actually help you be more articulate. But careful, too much gesticulating can come across as frantic and anxious.

 
Q8. Subtly mirroring someone’s body language is a great way to…


 
Absolutely. As a form of physical sympathy, subtly mirroring someone’s body language can help forge understanding and build rapport.

 
Well, not technically. Subtly mirroring someone’s body language is a form of physical sympathy: It shows you’re listening and can help forge understanding and build rapport. But take the subtlety away, and the other effects might come into play.

 
Ready to see your final score? 


Congratulations! You’re a body language master! You’re well aware of the subtle messages others are giving you and are ultra-savvy with the nonverbal signals you put out. You might as well submit your resume to be a professional interpreter now.
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Not too shabby—you’ve got a pretty solid hold on body language. You notice some of the more overt signals but aren’t fluent in all the silent subtleties. Don’t fret—these oversights obviously haven’t destroyed you, and learning more will only make you better. Thank you text goes here
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Looks like you’ve got some work to do! There are a slew of cues and hints that sail by you on a daily basis that you’re missing. Fortunately, we all naturally discern the big ones when they happen, even if tests trip you up on identifying them. Hang in there—the only place to go is up!
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